IELTS

TEST PATTERN

To make the most of their IELTS Preparation, students need to familiarize themselves completely with the IELTS Test pattern and the types of questions that are presented.
There are two versions of IELTS available for students. IELTS Academics and IELTS General. The difference lies in the purpose of the student. For Education it is IELTS Academics and for Immigration purposed like Permanent Resident or Citizenship, IETLS General is required.
IELTS

Reading – is 60 minutes duration with Scoring scale of 0-9 bands. Reading has 3 passages and 40 items (questions). Each item is worth one mark.

Writing – Writing skills assessment duration is 60 minutes, with Scoring scale of 0-9 bands. It consists of 2 tasks (Writing Task 1 and Writing Task 2) and candidates must attempt both tasks.

Listening – Listening tests duration is of 40 minutes, with Scoring scale of 0-9 bands. IELTS Listening has four sections, each with 10 items (or questions), each item is worth one mark.

Speaking – Speaking duration is 11-14 minutes with Scoring scale of 0-9 bands. IELTS Speaking is a one-to-one interaction between the candidate and an examiner.

The scores of the IELTS Exam are valid for TWO years.

Reasons to start your Journey with us
  1. Personal Attention
  2. Trainer who has himself lived abroad.
  3. Special morning and evening batched for working professionals.
  4. Unlimited doubt clearing sessions.
  5. Latest Up to Date Material.
  6. Exhaustive collection of tests and preparation material
  7. Teaching methodology aimed at simplifying your preparation
  8. Free University Counselling Session Included.

Improve your IELTS score today with faeducations!

7-Day Money Back Guarantee: Email us if you want to cancel for any reason and we will give you a full refund.

HERE'S WHAT YOU GET:

EXPERT-CREATED CONTENT

High-quality material for each section of the IELTS. Study anywhere, anytime with Eliot the IELTS expert.

FULL-LENGTH PRACTICE TEST

Time yourself taking a full-length practice test, just like you would on test day.

OVER 125 VIDEO LESSONS

Learn everything from basic English grammar to advanced IELTS strategies with our library of lesson videos.

STUDY SCHEDULE

Select the perfect study schedule based on your needs to stay on track and motivated with your studies.

OVER 600 PRACTICE QUESTIONS

Answer questions that are just like the real test. Then review our video and text explanations for each question.

ACCURATE SCORE PREDICTOR

We use data from over 200,000 students to accurately predict your score so you know what to expect on test day.

ASK-AN-EXPERT

Quick, helpful, email support from our IELTS Experts for when you get stuck or just want some extra help.

Process & Frequently Asked Questions

IELTS represents International English Language Testing System. IELTS test is intended to survey the English capability of an up-and-comer who needs to consider or get a type of preparing program in a school or college or needs to relocate to an English-talking district. IELTS gives a profile of a competitor's English capability and the profile contains a sign of an up-and-comer's capacity in a specific module just as a sign of generally speaking capacity.

IELTS is perceived by colleges and businesses in numerous nations, including Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the UK and the USA. It is additionally perceived by proficient bodies, migration specialists and other government offices.

For you, the IELTS score is proof of your English proficiency in general. IELTS is recognised worldwide and that's why if you have a good IELTS score, you can use this test result as a proof of your proficiency in handling English as a second language. If you want to migrate to a country where English is spoken or want to get enrolled in a college or university, the IELTS test result speaks for your English Language skills.

IELTS means or means "Worldwide English Language Testing System". This test is acknowledged by in excess of 10,000 foundations and numerous migration authority around the globe. Anybody can step through this examination and the test outcome mirrors his/her capability in the English language.

 

The one of a kind 9-band scoring arrangement of IELTS test estimates execution in a steady way, any place and at whatever point the test is taken. IELTS test is universally perceived.

 

At the point when you apply to get admission to a school or college or need to get a PR or residency in a nation where English is generally spoken, you have to demonstrate that you have required English language aptitudes. You take IELTS to show that you have the normal abilities in English.

The motivation behind the IELTS test is to test the up-and-comers' capacity to deal with the English language who need to study or work in a nation where English is the language of correspondence. IELTS result is likewise important for migration purposes.

 

Every year a large number of individuals take the IELTS test to accomplish a score that would demonstrate their English language capability. IELTS is one of the most broadly acknowledged global tests. IELTS test is accessible for understudies and migration candidates to exhibit their English language capability for explicit purposes.

 

Not really you will be permitted admission to an unfamiliar college, or get a visa to live there simply because of your IELTS score. It isn't the main necessity, however one of the numerous prerequisites. Yet, the school/college you will apply to, or the movement authority of the nation where you might want to relocate, will request verification of your English abilities and your IELTS score fills this need fine and dandy.

 

IELTS is owned and administered jointly by the British CouncilIDP: IELTS Australia and Cambridge Assessment English. These organisations set the exam standard, maintain the IELTS exam, monitor the standard, review and change the exam format and everything related to the IELTS exam.

Worldwide groups of trainers associated with the IELTS Authority add to IELTS test materials. Continuous examination guarantees that IELTS stays reasonable and impartial. IELTS test scholars are from various English-talking nations and they create IELTS content. So, it reflects real-life examples.

IELTS is accepted as a standardised international language test system for English language proficiency by a whole range of institutions. These include the majority of all educational establishments operating in English in Australia, Canada, the UK and New Zealand. The US educational institutions are also now starting to use it. Many international immigration services, as well as various professional organisations including the British and Australian Medical Councils and the UK Ministry of Defence, also use and accept the IELTS.

Yes, Over 3,400 institutions and programmes in the USA accept IELTS scores as proof of English language skills. Minimum score requirement in IELTS might vary from 6.5 to 9.0 depending on the university and major but you are reassured that you can apply to many universities in the USA with your valid IELTS score.

The computer-based version of IELTS is an alternative to paper-and-pencil based IELTS exam. This test is also called Computer-delivered IELTS and this format has been introduced recently. You can sit for any of the two types. However, computer-delivered IELTS is available at selected centres and test centres only. To find out if your nearby test centre offers the Computer-delivered IELTS, you will need to contact them.

The Reading, Writing and Listening modules in Computer-delivered IELTS are conducted using a computer but the speaking module would still be administered the way it had been, i.e. face-to-face interview session with an examiner. The Test Report Form, content, timing and structure of the test is the same whether you take the test on paper or on a computer.

In the computer-delivered Listening test, the timings are slightly different from the paper-based test. This is because the paper-based test requires users to transfer answers to an answer sheet. This step becomes redundant when answering directly on a computer.

To learn more about Computer-delivered IELTS and where it is available please visit https://www.ielts.org/about-the-test/computer-delivered-ielts

You do not need any special computer skills to take a computer-delivered IELTS test. If you can type on a keyboard and do some very basic computer-related tasks, you can take the test. Please note that a QWERTY keyboard is used for the test. The computer-delivered test is designed for people with average typing speed, so don't worry if your typing speed is not fast enough.

Yes, the computer-delivered IELTS provides a 'note-taking' and 'highlight' function that you can use for that purpose.

The answer is "YES" and "NO". Both IELTS and TOEFL are designed to evaluate the test-takers' English language skills for academic and communication purposes. Though the exam formats of these two exams are similar, there are few differences as well. You can take either TOEFL or IELTS if the college or university you are going to apply accepts either one. If they have any strict requirement for TOEFL, your IELTS score won’t be accepted. But in practice, most of the colleges, universities and immigration authorities accept both of these exams.

It is commonly known that the USA universities prefer TOEFL score whereas European and other universities accept IELTS. But recently the USA has agreed to recognise IELTS and accept either IELTS or TOEFL for admission purposes and hence they will accept both test results. However, there are still some institutes and universities that want a TOEFL score and do not accept IELTS. For an updated list of universities that accept IELTS, please visit https://www.ielts.org/

Absolutely NOT! IELTS officials use many means to ensure standardisation of Band Scores throughout the world. Of course, it could be true that taking IELTS in an English speaking country is beneficial, but only because you are being exposed to English every day not because taking the test there would give you any privilege regarding the exam.

IELTS questions, tests and result standards are strictly maintained all over the world. Focus on your preparation and improve your English skill, you will get a high band score from your nearby test centre.

IELTS test measures the language proficiency of test-takers who want to study or work where English is used as a language of communication. And as part of this assessment, it examines candidates' abilities in listening, reading, writing and speaking sections. All these tests cover a range of subjects within the item contents, but no specialized knowledge or academic knowledge, in particular, is required to take the IELTS test.

IELTS test is available in two formats – Academic and General Training.

» Academic Module is suitable for those who are going to apply for further studies and professional registration. If you are planning to get admitted to an undergraduate or postgraduate course at a college or university where English is necessary, you should take the Academic IELTS test. In fact, your university will ask for your academic IELTS score for that. General Training IELTS score is not accepted for this purpose.

» General Training Module is appropriate for those who are going to English-speaking countries to complete work experience and training programme, do secondary level education, or apply to migrate to a country where English is spoken. General Training IELTS assesses candidates' communication skill, which is needed for people who are not native English speakers and want to migrate to a country where English is the language of communication. The university or the immigration authority who will be receiving your papers can tell you in prior which form of IELTS you are required to complete. So, if you have any confusion, contacting the corresponding authority would be the best thing to do.

The Academic Version of IELTS is designed and intended for those who want to get admitted in universities or any other higher educational institutes for undergraduate and postgraduate courses and for professionals who want to study or practice in an English-speaking country.

The General Training (GT) IELTS is intended for those who are willing to gain work experience, undertake non-academic training or for immigration purposes. It is also accepted to enrol at the secondary level of education.

The listening and speaking sections are exactly the same both for the Academic and General Training IELTS candidates. The reading and writing sections differ. For academic IELTS candidates, the reading passages are longer and are generally related to academic reading. On the contrary, the GT readings are designed to test general instruction and basic reading ability. In writing part, the Academic candidates need to write a report or summary from a given chart, graph or diagram whereas the General Training candidates need to write a letter related to real-life issues.

IELTS Academic version is intended for those who want to study in a college or university where the medium of instruction is English, as well as for medical professionals who want to practice abroad. This test is designed for academic purposes except for the secondary education level in which GT IELTS is preferred.

The IELTS General Training (GT) Module is for those who want to migrate to an English speaking country, undergo practical vocational training, or do a work placement. Before you register we strongly advise you to check directly with the institution you are doing the test for. It is your responsibility to choose the test version that suits your purpose.

Consider the fact that, you need an academic IELTS score (as the name implies) to get admitted in an academic (be it a college or university). For general training or immigration purposes, you would require the General Training IELTS score.

If you have an academic IELTS test score, that would be usually accepted for secondary education or training purposes as well. But GT IELTS score might not be accepted by the college/university authority where you are planning to complete your undergraduate or postgraduate studies. Similarly, your Academic IELTS score will not be accepted when you are planning to migrate to an English speaking country.

It is advisable to contact the appropriate authority who would be processing your papers (admission/ training or immigration) to be sure which version of IELTS you are required to take.

There are 4 sections or modules in IELTS: Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking. All candidates take the same Listening and Speaking tests, but Reading and Writing tests vary depending on whether a candidate is taking the Academic IELTS test or the General Training IELTS test.

The Academic Reading test examines the candidates' ability to read and extract specific information from the reading materials. The reading passages are generally of academic interests and are designed to test how well the candidates would be able to conduct their academic reading where skimming and finding information, understanding themes of reading are necessary. 

The General Training Reading module tests candidates' ability to find specific instructions or information from reading materials which are generally found in everyday life.

The Academic Writing module tests candidates' ability to write a summary of a given illustration and the ability to write an essay on a given issue. The presentation, writing pattern, lexical resources, coherence and relevancy etc. are tested in writing task two (essay writing).

The General Training Writing examines the test takers skill on writing letters, applications as well as essay writing ability.

Note that the writing task two i.e. essay writing is same both for the Academic and GT IELTS test takers. 

The Listening part tests examinees' ability to understand the language and then recall the information heard.

The Speaking part tests candidates' ability to introduce themselves, talk about known issues, giving details of their background, discussing in details about general, social and international issues of common interest, vocabulary, fluency and overall speaking skills.

IELTS exam (both GT and Academic) has four parts or sections:

Listening: Duration - 30 minutes, questions - 40.
Reading: Duration - 60 minutes, questions - 40.
Writing: Duration - 60 minutes, 2 tasks.
Speaking: Duration 11–14 minutes, a three-part conversation with an examiner.

The total test time is 2 hours and 45 minutes.

The Listening, Reading and Writing tests are done in one sitting. The Speaking test may be on the same day or up to seven days before or after the other tests.

No, questions in the Reading test do not always come in order. Many a time, answers to Reading questions could be found in order, and in such cases, finding answers takes less time and effort because you know where to look at to find the answers to next questions. Unfortunately, not all answers are in order, and if you have found the answer to question 7, for example, in Paragraph 'D', there is no guarantee that the answer to the question 8 could be found in Paragraph 'E' as it may be well-hidden in Paragraph 'B'.

IELTS test is available on 48 fixed dates a year – up to four times a month, depending on local demand. You should check with your local test centre for available schedules. We can help you book your test and the location as per your convenience.

IELTS test centres can be found in almost all of the countries including yours. If you have seen a British Council, IDP or ESOL Examination office somewhere in your locality, you can get details from there.

For a comprehensive and most recent list of the IELTS test centres go to the page https://www.ielts.org/book-a-test/find-a-test-location

Select your country name and the city you live in, it will show all of the IELTS test centres around your locality.

IELTS is recommended for candidates over the age of 16. In another word, to take the IELTS test, a candidate should be minimum of 16 years old. However, if you are below 16 and want to take the test, there is no restriction on that. Minimum age limit is recommended, not imposed.

If you are below 16 and yet need to take the test for education or migration purposes, you can take the test. However, IELTS authority recommends the minimum age limit of 16 for taking the test.

Applicants between the ages of 14-64 now have to meet language requirements set out by the Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) to apply for Canadian citizenship. So if you are over 64 and live in Canada, there should be no problem in taking the test.

You will need the following to register for the IELTS exam:

1. Registration fee (you can pay in your local currency).
2. Valid Passport or National Identity Card.
3. Two copy colour passport size photographs.
4. Country and Language code.

Don't worry if you do not know the Country and Language code. You can find it at the help desk of the test centre or browse the country codes from https://www.ielts.org/-/media/pdfs/application-form.ashx?la=en

The above-mentioned materials and papers are usually required for the IELTS exam registration. However, the requirement might change and you should always contact the local IELTS authority before going there for registration. They can give you the details of the requirement for IELTS registration. Check the list and make sure you have all the necessary papers and materials for the registration process.

Many IELTS test centres offer a convenient method.
To book your IELTS online you need to upload a clear colour scan or photo of your passport and use your credit card to finalise the payment. Once the online registration is complete, you will get a confirmation message.

If the problem is related to your Internet connection, wait for a few minutes and then try again. If this is related to uploading your ID document or payment by credit card, please contact the Test Centre by selecting “Assistance for online registration, ID upload, payment”. Keep in mind, the scan-copy of your ID must be in colour and must include the parts of the document with the photograph of the bearer, signature, ID document number and personal details.

Yes, you can change the exam date and/or test venue once you register for the test. However, it is subject to availability and you have to apply for the change two weeks before your exam date. If it is less than 14 days or two weeks, you are not allowed to change your test date and venue. You cannot change it to a different calendar year either.

This will cost you a transfer fee of 35€. To ask for a transfer please phone the administration centre responsible for the test location you chose.

Usually, you cannot change the speaking test date alone. In case, you want to change the whole schedule, you have to pay a fee of 35€ and apply for it not less than 14 days before the exam date.

In case you have any serious health problem and can show related medical certificates, you can transfer your speaking test date without any charge. You have to contact the test centre in advance for that.

NO, driving licenses and student Identity Cards are not acceptable forms of identification for the IELTS registration and test. Candidates must have a valid passport or accepted identity card like Social Security Card, National ID card to register for the IELTS exam. The ID document specified on the application form has to be brought along on the test day.

Please note that Non-EU nationals must carry their passport as proof of their identity.

Using the Passport is the best form of presenting your identification.

If you postpone or cancel your application more than 5 weeks before the test date, you will receive a refund minus an administration charge. If you postpone or cancel within 5 weeks of the test date, you will be charged the full fee unless you have a medical reason. If you provide a medical certificate within 5 days of the test date, you will receive a refund minus the local administrative cost.

You can download the refund claim form from https://www.britishcouncil.it/sites/default/files/refund_claim_form_en.pdf

Browse detailed Transfer, Cancellation And Refund Policy

Both maintain the same standard and hence none is better than the other. Don't listen to myths and waste your time deciding which one you should choose as your IELTS test authority.

No, there is no discount for re-taking IELTS.

IELTS examination takes approximately 2 hours and 45 minutes to complete. The time schedules for the Reading, Writing and Listening sections are fixed but for the speaking section, that may vary.

Reading and Writing sections each one takes 1 hour or 60 minutes. The listening test takes 30 minutes. The speaking part usually lasts for 11-14 minutes but there is no fixed time limit for the interview or speaking section.

For details of the IELTS exam structure please visit About IELTS

The Listening, Reading and Writing components of the test are always completed immediately after each other and with no break. Depending on the test centre, the Speaking test may be taken up to 7 days either before or after the test date. So you should be prepared to take the Speaking exam on a day and then take the rest of the test on a different date.

You will most probably take the Listening test first, followed by the Reading and Writing tests. Be informed that, there are no breaks between these tests. Your Speaking test will be held either on the same day or within seven days before or after that, depending on the test centre's local arrangements.

Once you register for the test, you will receive an email, usually 5-7 days before the exam date with details on test venue address and the timetable of the tests.

After you reach the exam centre, your identification (Passport or National Identification Card) would be checked. You will be asked to submit any gadget or bag you bring with you, take Test Day Photography and then allowed to enter the exam centre. All there process takes up to 30 minutes. So it is advisable that you reach your exam centre for at least one hour before your exam timetable.

No, you are not permitted to wear any watch while you take the IELTS test. Wearing any watch, be it a smartwatch or a simple analogue watch, is prohibited. To manage your time, you need to use the clock on the wall in the exam room. Interestingly, you are not permitted to wear a watch even when you take the speaking test.

No, there is no break between the reading and writing test. The Listening, Reading and Writing components of the test are always completed immediately after each other and with no break in between.

You can only bring water in a transparent bottle with the label removed. You can not bring any other food and drink item in the test room. Candidates asking for an exemption on the grounds of medical needs should tick the relevant box when they register for the test, and must supply medical evidence, in original, paper format, before the test date.

Yes, in the paper-based IELTS you are allowed an additional 10 minutes to transfer your answer. But, in the computer-delivered Listening test, this step becomes redundant when answering directly on a computer, and hence you would not get an additional 10 minutes to transfer your answer.

In your "Listening test", you will be given an additional 10 minutes to transfer your answer to your answer sheet, but in your "Reading test", you won't be given any extra time. The Reading test is one hour, and you must write all your answers on the answer sheet within this time. No separate time is given in the Reading test.

Yes, at the beginning of the Listening test, you will hear instructions and a sample question. Then you read section 1 questions, listen to section 1 and answer the questions. And there are several instructions and paused in your Listening test to allow you to read the question instructions and questions so that you know what and how to answer questions.

You will listen to it only once. So, if you miss the answer to a question, you should quickly make a guess and then focus on the next question.

Spelling is very important in your IELTS test. For wrong spelling, you will lose full marks for a question in your Reading and Listening test, which will impact your band score. For incorrect spellings, your writing score will also be affected. Please note that both American and British spelling are correct in IELTS.

Certain test locations have introduced a new procedure for enhancing IELTS test security that involves taking and authenticating photographs of test-takers on the test day. Under this new procedure, IELTS administration staff will take an individual, passport-style, photograph of all candidates present on the test day. The photograph will normally be taken on the day of the speaking test. The test day photograph will be printed on candidates’ Test Report Forms, and will only be used for the test-related purpose (including but not limited to Test Report Form issuance, receiving organization verification, etc.) in accordance with national and international data protection law.
It usually takes 30 seconds per candidate on average to take the test day photo.

If you get seriously ill during the test, you should report it to the test supervisor immediately. Then the test centre will take special care of the situation and might give special consideration. No consideration or favour is possible if it is not brought to the attention of the test supervisor.

If you are away on the test day with no prior notice, you will lose your full fee. However, if you provide a medical certificate within 5 days of the test date, you will receive a refund minus the local administrative cost.

Don't consider IELTS exam as one of your class tests where you can contact your course teacher or administrative officer and take the exam at an alternative schedule. IELTS tests are pre-scheduled and you won't get an alternative exam schedule if you miss your exam for no valid reason.

Some unavoidable reasons might prevent you from taking the exams. If you fail to appear for IELTS test for no valid reason, you will be treated as a 'no show' candidate by the IELTS exam authority. No refunds will be possible for a 'no show' candidate. However, there are some special circumstances under which your application may be considered with some conditions. Acceptance of your form is subject to approval by the test centre and if you can't give a strong reason with supporting papers & documents, you won't get any refund.

The test centre may offer you a test on the next available test date if they feel that the circumstance (for instance, transport strike or natural calamities) was really beyond your control. However, you should immediately notify the test centre for such unavoidable circumstances.

IELTS aims to assess the English language skills of all test takers fairly and objectively. The IELTS test centres can make arrangements to accommodate special circumstances or requirements to enable such test-takers to attend a test centre and to understand questions and tasks and give their answers. Test centres require three months’ notice to put special arrangements in place. Generally, some special circumstances are considered like, Visual difficulties, Hearing difficulties, Illness.

If a candidate is absent on the day of the IELTS test s/he will be treated as a 'No Show' candidate. S/he will not get any result and if s/he was absent without giving prior notice, will normally lose the full test fee unless he/she provides appropriate medical evidence to the centre to explain the absence. Medical evidence must be provided within 5 days of the test.

IELTS exam has no "pass" or "fail". IELTS results are prepared on a nine-band scale. In addition to the score for overall language ability, IELTS provides a score in the form of a profile for each of the four skills i.e. Listening, Reading, Writing and speaking. If you attend the IELTS exam and complete it, you will be given a report of the result (known as Test Report Form) that would include individual band score of the four modules as well as the overall band score. This band score would reflect your skills and ability to handle the English language.

IELTS uses a 9-band scoring system to measure and report test scores in a consistent manner. You receive individual band scores for Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking and an Overall Band Score on a band scale from one to nine. Your answers are checked by designated IELTS examiners who use the band score criteria to score your tests. Your speaking exam is recorded and evaluated a second time.

No, you won't lose any point for wrong answers in your IELTS test. So it is recommended that you attempt to answer all your questions in your IELTS test and guess answers to questions which you are not sure about.

The IELTS test centre will produce the result after 13 calendar days of the test. At some centres, candidates may collect their results on the 13th day from the test centres or it is mailed to candidates on the 13th day. Keep your Test Report Form in a secure place as you only receive one copy.

Most candidates now collect their IELTS result from the internet. However, test centres do not give results to the candidates over the phone or by fax or e-mail. In some countries, the result is sent via SMS to the number the candidate has given while registering for the test. Please note that online results service is only available through selected & managed test centres and the system will not display results for more than 40 days after the test date.

You can check your IELTS result online from https://www.ielts.org/book-a-test/getting-your-results

Yes, you can. You can see your test result online 13 days after the written test day. Visit this link to see your result online. Results and performance feedback will be available up to 40 days after the test date, which means the system will not display results for more than 40 days from the date you take the test.

No, you can not have this facility from many test centres. You can, however, check your result online 13 days after the exam date or receive it via postal/courier service to the address you specified during your IELTS registration. Some test centres may send your SMS regarding the result. If you indicated “Don’t send” on the envelope on the test day, you will be able to collect your certificate from the IELTS test centre. It is advisable that you ask the test centre how may you collect/get your test result while you register for the test.

If you withdraw from the speaking test and do not appear at the test centre, the IELTS administrator will not issue the Test Result Form (TRF) to you. If you decide to withdraw from the speaking test but would still like to receive your TRF, you must come to the speaking test venue to complete the test procedure.

A Test Report Form (TRF) or IELTS result is valid for 2 years from the date of the exam. Usually, you should consider your IELTS score valid for 2 years and if your IELTS Report Form is older than 2 years, you should consider re-taking the exam.

If you take the IELTS test twice, you can use either one of the two test results. Obviously, you will use the test result in which you have scored better. Both test results will remain valid for 2 years from the date you take the test. Taking a new IELTS test does not invalidate previous scores.

The Overall Band Score in IELTS is calculated with the average of the scores in four components (Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking), rounded to the nearest whole or half band and the component scores are weighted equally. This method is called a half-band score.

So, if the average of the four components ends in .25, the Overall Band Score is rounded up to the next half band, and if it ends in .75, the Overall Band Score is rounded up to the next whole band. Alternatively, if the average ends with a fraction below .25 or .75, the overall score is rounded down. An example will explain how this is done:

Someone's scores in 4 components are; Reading = 6.5, Writing = 5, Speaking = 7  & Listening = 6.5. So to the total = 25. So the average is = 6.25 (Divide 25 by 4) which ends in .25. So it would be rounded up to the next half band which is 6.5. This is why the candidate would be awarded an overall band score of 6.5.

You might apply for an enquiry on results (EoR) procedure within six weeks from the date you took the IELTS exam, using a prescribed form by the IELTS authority if you are dissatisfied with the result you got. The application for re-examining the score needs you to fill the form which must be paid prior to the processing of the appeal. The fees may vary depending on the countries and IELTS centres. Then your result will be re-examined and if necessary will be corrected. Your fee will be fully refunded if your band score changes from the re-examination or reassessment.

You can download the refund claim form from https://www.britishcouncil.it/sites/default/files/refund_claim_form_en.pdf

You can apply for an ‘Enquiry on Results’ procedure at your test centre within six weeks of the test date. You must pay an enquiry fee, which is fully refunded if your band score changes.

Enquiries on Result/re-marking usually takes 6 to 8 weeks to complete. So you can expect your IELTS result to be re-marked after at least 6 weeks and not more than 8 weeks of application.

No, if you apply for remarking you will not be shown your answer sheets. IELTS materials are confidential and past papers are not released to candidates under any circumstances.

IELTS test authority uses the information from your passport and your application form to prepare the TRF for you. So if your passport or application form already has the same error, IELTS authority will not take responsibility for that. But should an error occur that you believe was not your responsibility, please contact the IELTS Test Authority with valid documents. They will send you a new Test Report Form and ask you to submit your previous one.

Yes, you can as long the test result is valid. IELTS test result is still valid for 2 years from the date you took the exam.

No, you cannot combine test results from different tests. However, you can use either of these two results (you would use the best one obviously).

You will receive only one copy of your Test Report Form. Replacement copies are not issued in the event of loss or damage. So keep your Original Test Report Form (TRF) at a secured location.

Keep your Test Report Form in a secure place as you only receive only one copy. Test Report Forms are valid for two years from the date of taking the exam. Copies are not sent to candidates but IELTS will forward a Test Report Form to your relevant institution or embassy. Up to five copies will be sent free of charge. Additional copies will incur a small administration charge. Talk to your test centre for further details.

IELTS results are prepared on a nine-band scale. In addition to the score for overall language ability, IELTS provides a score in the form of a profile for each of the four skills (Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking). These scores are also reported on a nine-band scale. Each Overall Band Score corresponds to a descriptive statement which gives a summary of the English language ability of a candidate classified at that level. The nine bands and their descriptive statements are as follows:

9 Expert User
Has fully operational command of the language: appropriate, accurate and fluent with complete understanding.
8 Very Good User
Has fully operational command of the language with only occasional unsystematic inaccuracies and it appropriates. Handles complex detailed argumentation well.
7 Good User
Has operational command of the language, though with occasional inaccuracies, inappropriateness and misunderstandings in some situations. Generally handles complex language well and understands the detailed reasoning.
6 Competent User
Has generally effective command of the language despite some inaccuracies, inappropriate and misunderstandings. Can use and understand fairly complex language, particularly in familiar situations.
5 Modest User
Has partial command of the language, coping with overall meaning in most situations, though is likely to make many mistakes. The candidate should be able to handle communication in his or her own field.
4 Limited User
Basic competence is limited to familiar situations. Has frequent problems in using complex language.
3 Extremely Limited User
Conveys and understands only general meaning in very familiar situations. Frequent breakdowns in communication occur.
2 Intermittent User
No real communication is possible except for the most basic information using isolated words or short formulae in familiar situations and to meet immediate needs. Has great difficulty understanding spoken and written English.
1 Non User
Essentially has no ability to use the language beyond possibly a few isolated words.
0 Did not Attempt The test
No accessible information provided.

IELTS Paper-based Test results are published on the 13th day after you take the rest. Computer-delivered Test is available earlier, after 5 to 7 days. So, if you are yet to receive your IELTS result when more than 13 days have already passed, your result has most probably been withheld!

By now you should receive an email from the IELTS authority about what has happened. If you are confused about what is happening, the first thing we recommend is contacting the test centre. We suggest that you email or phone them. The IELTS terms & conditions clause on the 'IELTS Application Form' states that -  

"Your result may not be issued 13 days after the test if the IELTS Test Partners decide that it is necessary to review any matter associated with your test or the administration of your test. To assist any investigation, you may be required to provide writing and speaking samples. In exceptional circumstances, you may be required to re-take one or more IELTS components."

This means that you may not receive your IETLS test results after 13 days of taking the test because IELTS authority needs to check the results more thoroughly because they believe that either 1) they need to check your test again or 2) they are doing quality control checks on how the test was managed/administered.

Your result may be cancelled after it has been issued if any irregularity is identified. You may be required to re-take one or more IELTS components in such cases.

IELTS exam has no "pass" or "fail". IELTS results are prepared on a nine-band scale. In addition to the score for overall language ability, IELTS provides a score in the form of a profile for each of the four skills i.e. Listening, Reading, Writing and speaking. If you attend the IELTS exam and complete it, you will be given a report of the result (known as Test Report Form) that would include individual band score of the four modules as well as the overall band score. This band score would reflect your skills and ability to handle the English language.

IELTS uses a 9-band scoring system to measure and report test scores in a consistent manner. You receive individual band scores for Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking and an Overall Band Score on a band scale from one to nine. Your answers are checked by designated IELTS examiners who use the band score criteria to score your tests. Your speaking exam is recorded and evaluated a second time.

No, you won't lose any point for wrong answers in your IELTS test. So it is recommended that you attempt to answer all your questions in your IELTS test and guess answers to questions which you are not sure about.

The IELTS test centre will produce the result after 13 calendar days of the test. At some centres, candidates may collect their results on the 13th day from the test centres or it is mailed to candidates on the 13th day. Keep your Test Report Form in a secure place as you only receive one copy.

Most candidates now collect their IELTS result from the internet. However, test centres do not give results to the candidates over the phone or by fax or e-mail. In some countries, the result is sent via SMS to the number the candidate has given while registering for the test. Please note that online results service is only available through selected & managed test centres and the system will not display results for more than 40 days after the test date.

You can check your IELTS result online from https://www.ielts.org/book-a-test/getting-your-results

Yes, you can. You can see your test result online 13 days after the written test day. Visit this link to see your result online. Results and performance feedback will be available up to 40 days after the test date, which means the system will not display results for more than 40 days from the date you take the test.

No, you can not have this facility from many test centres. You can, however, check your result online 13 days after the exam date or receive it via postal/courier service to the address you specified during your IELTS registration. Some test centres may send your SMS regarding the result. If you indicated “Don’t send” on the envelope on the test day, you will be able to collect your certificate from the IELTS test centre. It is advisable that you ask the test centre how may you collect/get your test result while you register for the test.

If you withdraw from the speaking test and do not appear at the test centre, the IELTS administrator will not issue the Test Result Form (TRF) to you. If you decide to withdraw from the speaking test but would still like to receive your TRF, you must come to the speaking test venue to complete the test procedure.

A Test Report Form (TRF) or IELTS result is valid for 2 years from the date of the exam. Usually, you should consider your IELTS score valid for 2 years and if your IELTS Report Form is older than 2 years, you should consider re-taking the exam.

If you take the IELTS test twice, you can use either one of the two test results. Obviously, you will use the test result in which you have scored better. Both test results will remain valid for 2 years from the date you take the test. Taking a new IELTS test does not invalidate previous scores.

The Overall Band Score in IELTS is calculated with the average of the scores in four components (Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking), rounded to the nearest whole or half band and the component scores are weighted equally. This method is called a half-band score.

So, if the average of the four components ends in .25, the Overall Band Score is rounded up to the next half band, and if it ends in .75, the Overall Band Score is rounded up to the next whole band. Alternatively, if the average ends with a fraction below .25 or .75, the overall score is rounded down. An example will explain how this is done:

Someone's scores in 4 components are; Reading = 6.5, Writing = 5, Speaking = 7  & Listening = 6.5. So to the total = 25. So the average is = 6.25 (Divide 25 by 4) which ends in .25. So it would be rounded up to the next half band which is 6.5. This is why the candidate would be awarded an overall band score of 6.5.

You might apply for an enquiry on results (EoR) procedure within six weeks from the date you took the IELTS exam, using a prescribed form by the IELTS authority if you are dissatisfied with the result you got. The application for re-examining the score needs you to fill the form which must be paid prior to the processing of the appeal. The fees may vary depending on the countries and IELTS centres. Then your result will be re-examined and if necessary will be corrected. Your fee will be fully refunded if your band score changes from the re-examination or reassessment.

You can download the refund claim form from https://www.britishcouncil.it/sites/default/files/refund_claim_form_en.pdf

You can apply for an ‘Enquiry on Results’ procedure at your test centre within six weeks of the test date. You must pay an enquiry fee, which is fully refunded if your band score changes.

Enquiries on Result/re-marking usually takes 6 to 8 weeks to complete. So you can expect your IELTS result to be re-marked after at least 6 weeks and not more than 8 weeks of application.

No, if you apply for remarking you will not be shown your answer sheets. IELTS materials are confidential and past papers are not released to candidates under any circumstances.

IELTS test authority uses the information from your passport and your application form to prepare the TRF for you. So if your passport or application form already has the same error, IELTS authority will not take responsibility for that. But should an error occur that you believe was not your responsibility, please contact the IELTS Test Authority with valid documents. They will send you a new Test Report Form and ask you to submit your previous one.

Yes, you can as long the test result is valid. IELTS test result is still valid for 2 years from the date you took the exam.

No, you cannot combine test results from different tests. However, you can use either of these two results (you would use the best one obviously).

You will receive only one copy of your Test Report Form. Replacement copies are not issued in the event of loss or damage. So keep your Original Test Report Form (TRF) at a secured location.

Keep your Test Report Form in a secure place as you only receive only one copy. Test Report Forms are valid for two years from the date of taking the exam. Copies are not sent to candidates but IELTS will forward a Test Report Form to your relevant institution or embassy. Up to five copies will be sent free of charge. Additional copies will incur a small administration charge. Talk to your test centre for further details.

IELTS results are prepared on a nine-band scale. In addition to the score for overall language ability, IELTS provides a score in the form of a profile for each of the four skills (Listening, Reading, Writing and Speaking). These scores are also reported on a nine-band scale. Each Overall Band Score corresponds to a descriptive statement which gives a summary of the English language ability of a candidate classified at that level. The nine bands and their descriptive statements are as follows:

9 Expert User
Has fully operational command of the language: appropriate, accurate and fluent with complete understanding.
8 Very Good User
Has fully operational command of the language with only occasional unsystematic inaccuracies and it appropriates. Handles complex detailed argumentation well.
7 Good User
Has operational command of the language, though with occasional inaccuracies, inappropriateness and misunderstandings in some situations. Generally handles complex language well and understands the detailed reasoning.
6 Competent User
Has generally effective command of the language despite some inaccuracies, inappropriate and misunderstandings. Can use and understand fairly complex language, particularly in familiar situations.
5 Modest User
Has partial command of the language, coping with overall meaning in most situations, though is likely to make many mistakes. The candidate should be able to handle communication in his or her own field.
4 Limited User
Basic competence is limited to familiar situations. Has frequent problems in using complex language.
3 Extremely Limited User
Conveys and understands only general meaning in very familiar situations. Frequent breakdowns in communication occur.
2 Intermittent User
No real communication is possible except for the most basic information using isolated words or short formulae in familiar situations and to meet immediate needs. Has great difficulty understanding spoken and written English.
1 Non User
Essentially has no ability to use the language beyond possibly a few isolated words.
0 Did not Attempt The test
No accessible information provided.

IELTS Paper-based Test results are published on the 13th day after you take the rest. Computer-delivered Test is available earlier, after 5 to 7 days. So, if you are yet to receive your IELTS result when more than 13 days have already passed, your result has most probably been withheld!

By now you should receive an email from the IELTS authority about what has happened. If you are confused about what is happening, the first thing we recommend is contacting the test centre. We suggest that you email or phone them. The IELTS terms & conditions clause on the 'IELTS Application Form' states that -  

"Your result may not be issued 13 days after the test if the IELTS Test Partners decide that it is necessary to review any matter associated with your test or the administration of your test. To assist any investigation, you may be required to provide writing and speaking samples. In exceptional circumstances, you may be required to re-take one or more IELTS components."

This means that you may not receive your IETLS test results after 13 days of taking the test because IELTS authority needs to check the results more thoroughly because they believe that either 1) they need to check your test again or 2) they are doing quality control checks on how the test was managed/administered.

Your result may be cancelled after it has been issued if any irregularity is identified. You may be required to re-take one or more IELTS components in such cases.

IELTS Reading is to test your ability to understand what you have read.  So even if you don’t know some words you can guess their meaning and get band 9!

Most of the test-takers lose marks not because of lack of knowledge, because of making very simple mistakes!


Top 10 IELTS Reading tips  help you to get a high score in IELTS Reading:

  1. Skim over and watch for the answers
    Skimming refers to looking only for the main ideas. You don’t need to read attentively every word. Remember, you just need to answer the questions, nothing more. So skim over the text and then start looking for the answers.

  2. Watch your time
    Don’t forget you have only 60 minutes to read three texts and answer 40 questions. You won’t get additional time for filling your answer sheet, so make sure manage your time properly.

  3. Is your spelling correct?
    Check your spelling before writing your answer on the answer blank. You will get zero points for the answer if it’s spelled incorrectly.

  4. Keep the order
    Remember that the questions follow the order of the text in most cases. So the answer to question 5 will come after the answer to question 4 and so on.

  5. Underline!
    When you skim over the text, underline the most important phrases. It will help you to save some time when you will search for answers.

  6. Unfamiliar vocabulary? That’s OK!
    Do not worry if the text seems unfamiliar to you or you don’t know some words. Every answer can be found in the text, you don’t need any additional knowledge to succeed.

  7. Pay attention to the details
    Look thoroughly through the text. Any special features such as capital letters, underlining, italics, figures, graphs and tables are likely to matter.

  8. No blank boxes
    Answer all the questions, even if you’re not sure in your answer. You don’t get penalty for wrong answers, so try your luck and write the most probable answer.

  9. Cross out the wrong answers
    If you saw answer that you’re sure is wrong, cross it out. This way you won’t get confused and save your time.

  10. Choose your own technique
    It may sound strange at first, but… There is no ultimate advice which technique fits you the best. You should choose yourself how to search for right answers and what to do first: read questions or text. A lot successful candidates prefer to read the text first, and only then answer the questions. But some say it’s better to do the other way. Practise doing IELTS Reading samples to determine which technique fits you more.

IELTS Reading: False or not given?

Students are often confused by the difference between ‘false’ and ‘not given’.

You should choose false if the information in the passage directly contradicts the question statement; in other words, you need to be able to show that a different answer would be true. Choose not given only when there is no information, or not enough information.

One type of question asks you to “match the names with a statement”. You will see a list of people’s names (often researchers or experts) and you have to match each name with a statement about what he/she did or said.

Here’s some advice for this type of question:

1. Find all of the names in the passage first. Scan the whole passage quickly (don’t read it, just search for the names) and underline all the names that the question asks you about.

2. Remember that academic articles often only use surnames. For example, if one of the names is Robert Smith, you might not see the first name ‘Robert’ in the passage. Just look for the surname ‘Smith’.

3. Do difficult questions last. If one name is mentioned 3 times in 3 different paragraphs, it will be more difficult to match with a statement than a name that is only mentioned once. Start with the name that is only mentioned once.

4. When you find a match, put a cross next to the statement; you will only use each statement once.

5. As usual, look for “keywords” – Similar words in the passage and the question.

IELTS Reading: easy questions first

A good technique for the IELTS reading test is to do easy questions first. If you get stuck on difficult questions, miss them. Do the easy questions, then return to the tricky questions later.

What’s the easiest type of question?

The easiest type of question is probably any question that contains a name, number or date. For these questions, it should be easy to scan the text to find where the answer is.

If you find it difficult to get started in the exam, look for a question with a name, number or date, and start there. An easy question will help you to start confidently.

IELTS Reading: skimming and scanning?

Many teachers and books talk about skimming and scanning as key techniques for IELTS reading.

I have stopped using the words ‘skimming’ and ‘scanning’ in my lessons because I find that they confuse students. In fact, many students get the wrong answers because they ‘skim’ too quickly and miss the words that they are looking for.

So, forget ‘skimming’ and ‘scanning’ and focus on ‘finding’ and ‘understanding’.

1. Finding: read the text to find words from the question.

2. Understanding: when you have found some key words from the question, read that part of the text carefully in order to understand it and get the right answer.

1. Should you read the whole passage before looking at the questions?
2. Should you go to the questions first, then skim/scan to find the answers?

My answer to question 1 is no. You don’t have time to read the whole passage unless your English is almost ‘native speaker’ level.

My answer to question 2 is yes and no.
Yes – go to the questions first.
No – don’t skim or scan unless the question contains a name or number.

My advice is to do the questions one by one. Instead of skimming or scanning, read the passage carefully. The answers to most question sections will be in order in the passage, so you will gradually read the whole passage as you find the answers.

IELTS Reading: finding and understanding

ELTS reading is really a test of 2 things:

1. Can you find the part of the text that contains the answer?

2. Do you understand that part of the text?

Finding

You need to be able to find the right part of the text quickly. I practise this a lot with my students: we decide which words in the question we need to search for, then we try to locate those words (or words with the same meaning) in the text.

Understanding

When you have found where the answer is, you need to read that part of the text carefully. Read the sentences before and after the keywords that you found. Then it becomes a test of your vocabulary knowledge: if you don’t understand the words that you are reading, it will be difficult to get the right answer.

1. Do these questions last

Paragraph headings’ questions are difficult, especially because the answers will not be in order in the text. For most other types of question, the answers will be in order in the text. So, do the other questions first, then you will be familiar with the text when you return to the ‘paragraph headings’ questions. You might even find that you are able to match some of the paragraphs really quickly because you remember what they were about.

2. Start with the shortest paragraphs

Instead of starting with the first paragraph, why not start with the shortest paragraph? If there is a really short paragraph, it should be easier to match it to a heading. Then you will have fewer headings to choose from for the longer paragraphs.

3. Look for similar words

As with most types of IELTS reading question, you should be able to find words in the paragraph that are similar to words in the heading.

4. Move on if you are spending too much time

‘Paragraph headings’ questions often take a long time. Don’t allow yourself to use more than 20 minutes for each reading passage. If you haven’t finished after 20 minutes, move on to the next passage.

which paragraph contains…?
Which paragraph contains the following information?” This type of question is not the same as “match the headings to the paragraphs.
Here are some tips for “which paragraph contains?” questions:

  • Instead of looking for the main idea of each paragraph, you need to find one piece of information.
  • Some paragraphs might not contain any answers
  • The same paragraph might contain more than one answer
  • It’s not usually difficult to understand the question or answer, but it is difficult to find the answer
  • Do these questions last. By doing other questions first, you will become familiar with the passage, and you might remember where some of the answers are
  • Look for the easiest information first: questions that contain names, numbers or big/unusual words might be easier to find

 Always read the question.
🔸 Predict the topic
🔸 Use a minute to look through each section
🔸 Careful with question order
🔸 Look at two questions at once
🔸 Move on if you miss an answer
🔸 Watch others if you’re completely lost
🔸 Look out for paraphrasing
🔸 Ignore words you don’t
🔸 Underline key words
🔸 Take care with spelling and grammar
🔸 Use British or American spelling
🔸 Don’t worry about what you write on the exam sheet
🔸 Read the instructions
🔸 Use upper or lower case letters
🔸 Get used to the British accent
🔸 Practice the pronunciation of letter and numbers
🔸 Careful with what you write down
🔸 Don’t leave answers blank
🔸 Transfer your answers to the answer sheet carefully
🔸 Check your answers
🔸 Listen very carefully
🔸 Practice listening
🔸 Listen to lectures
🔸 Learn to listen and write together

  • 🔸 At the beginning of each section read the questions for that section carefully, before the recording starts. This will help you to follow the recording and identify the answers.
  • 🔸 After completing a section, it is better to look ahead and read the questions for the next section than to worry about the last section.
  • 🔸 You will sometimes have a list of options to choose from as answers. The possible answers may be listed in alphabetical order and not necessarily in the order you will hear them.
  • 🔸 Be careful to note word limits. If there is an instruction: Write no more than two words, writing more than two words will mean you will receive no marks at all for your answer, even if some of the words are correct.
  • 🔸 Try to listen for key words or synonyms (words that have the same or nearly the same meaning as another word) from the question to help you identify the answer. For example, in the recording you might hear: “She likes going to the gym and playing tennis. On your answer sheet/screen (in computer-delivered IELTS), this could appear as “She is an active person.”
  • 🔸 You may be asked to write down words that have been spelled out in the recording. In order to do this well, you need to know the English alphabet and how each letter is pronounced (for example, the letter ‘W’ is pronounced as ‘double-u’).
  • 🔸 Listen carefully for words that indicate which stage of the recording you are listening to, e.g. ‘firstly’, ‘my next point’, ‘to sum up’. These words will help you identify which question you have reached.
  • 🔸 As you are listening to the recording, cross out options that don’t fit. This makes it easier for you to find the right answer.
  • 🔸 If you are writing dates as an answer to any question, remember that there are several correct ways to write them (e.g. 24th April, April 24 and 24 April are all correct).
  • 🔸 If there are questions you cannot answer leave them and move on to the next question. This will help you to stay calm and positive. Go back to those questions at the end, if you have time.
  • 🔸 In paper-based IELTS, after the last recording has ended you have 10 minutes to transfer your answers from the Listening booklet to your answer sheet. Don’t make the mistake of copying these answers across to the answer sheet in between sections or you may miss important information about the next section of the test. Wait until the end of Section 4 before transferring your answers.
top
© faeducations. All rights reserved.